Was That Really Andy Warhol in a Super Bowl Ad?

Yes, that was the late Andy Warhol in a Burger King ad during the fourth quarter of the Super Bowl — and no technological wizardry was involved.

The boredom of the Super Bowl did not affect your eyesight. That was the real Andy Warhol, in a video clip from 1982, eating a Burger King burger in a commercial that aired during the game. The video was originally created for a film called “66 Scenes from America” by Swedish director Jorgen Leth. Burger King received the Andy Warhol Foundation’s permission to use the clip.

We did the math for you: That means that this commercial has been in the making for 37 years.

But what does it all mean?

“The spot is meant to break through the traditional Super Bowl commercial break, filled with explosions, slapstick jokes and celebrities, with an almost silent, yet powerful work of art,” Burger King said in a press statement.

Who better to do that than Pittsburgh’s favorite homegrown artist?

Burger King says it was trying to embody a Warhol quote from “1975 Philosophy of Andy Warhol”: “What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest.”

According to the press release, Burger King wanted viewers to see that it didn’t matter what your background was or how much money you made, you could still enjoy a Whopper just like everyone else. (As long as you use Heinz ketchup, of course).

Finally, a bit of irony: Elsewhere in “1975 Philosophy of Andy Warhol,” the artist wrote, “The most beautiful thing in Tokyo is McDonald’s. The most beautiful thing is Stockholm is McDonald’s. The most beautiful thing in Florence is McDonald’s. Peking and Moscow don’t have anything beautiful yet.”

Categories: The 412