Then and Now: How 4 Iconic Pittsburgh Buildings Evolved over Time

These expertly constructed downtown landmarks with striking architecture have stood the test of time.

Old Allegheny County Jail


Pittsburgh Prints from the Collection of Wesley Pickard, ca. 1843-1982, AIS.2006.03. Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

The building served from 1886-1995 and now survives as the Allegheny County Juvenile Court. You still can experience a bit of the place's sad and spooky history via self-guided tours on Monday afternoons.
 

The building served from 1886-1995 and now survives as the Allegheny County Juvenile Court. Fortunately, you can still experience a bit of the sad and spooky history of this place via self-guided tours on Monday afternoons. – See more at: http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Pittsburgh-Magazine/October-2011/Bizarre-Pittsburgh/index.php?cparticle=1&siarticle=0#artanc


PHOTO BY DAVE DICELLO

Union Trust Building (formerly the Union Arcade)


Union Arcade Building Photographs, 1915-1916, AIS.2005.09, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Financed by Henry Clay Frick, this building originally was supposed to house both shops and offices. Today, the nearly 100-year-old structure is home base for several companies, including tech/fitness firm Jawbone.
 


PHOTO VIA FLICKR

Fort Pitt Block House


AIS Photograph Collection, ca. 1880- ca. 1980, AIS.1991.19a, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh’s oldest building has outlived the larger structures it was built to support — first by chance and later by determination. Constructed in 1764 as one of five redoubts to aid in the defense of the British-built Fort Pitt, the Block House celebrated its 250th anniversary last year.
 


PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY

Omni William Penn Hotel (formerly William Penn Hotel)


Pittsburgh City Photographer Collection, 1901-2002, AIS.1971.05, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Henry Clay Frick first forayed into the hotel-construction business when he put dollars behind this downtown project. Now called the Omni William Penn, the hotel has stood at William Penn Place since the early 20th century.
 


PHOTOS VIA FLICKR

 

Sean Collier contributed to this post.
 
Categories: The 412