New Science Lab to Debut This Summer in the Hill District

The lab, a partnership between Duquesne University and Urban Innovation 21, will offer courses for a range of learners, including students in grades 3-12.


PHOTO COURTESY THE LAB'S FACEBOOK PAGE

DUQUESNE-BACKED SCIENCE LAB SET FOR FIRST SUMMER
In early 2015, Duquesne University partnered with Urban Innovation21 to open The Citizen Science Lab, which provides a hands-on experience and lab space for children, students, adults and businesses. In its first summer, the lab features seven weeks of courses that will help kids from grades 3-12 explore life sciences. The courses are offered in weeklong sessions from June 15 through July 24 at the lab, located in the Energy Innovation Center in the Hill District. "Usually, during the school year you get lecture after lecture and not a lot of hands on experimentation,” lab Director Dr. Andre Samuel says in a news release. “At our summer camp … participants spend their time experimenting as a way of learning and building skill sets that are highly desirable in the STEM workforce." The sessions focus on topics such as DNA structures and functions, microscopy and chemistry/biochemistry experiments like making candy. The cost is $175 per week; registration is available online.

PITT HIRES ENGINEERING PROFESSOR FOCUSED ON FUTURE OF BATTERIES
The University of Pittsburgh is putting a charge into its Swanson School of Engineering this fall. Nanoelectronics and polymer researcher Susan Fullerton, a research assistant professor at the University of Notre Dame, is set to join the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at Pitt. Dr. Fullerton, who earned a bachelor of science and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Penn State University, works in Notre Dame’s Department of Electrical Engineering and the Notre Dame Center for Nano Science and Technology. Her research focuses on developing materials for low-power electronics and next-generation batteries, and she says she sees a big future in the field. “The full potential of polymers in combination with two-dimensional materials is only recently being uncovered — these could be the key materials for lowering the power of a transistor,” she says in a news release. “When you consider all [of] the electronic devices that require transistors to perform logic, the potential impact of this work is tremendous, and I’m looking forward to continuing my research at Pitt and collaborating with the Swanson School faculty.”

CARLOW, UPMC LINK UP IN NURSING
Carlow University and UPMC Schools of Nursing plan to team up to provide a clear path in the field of nursing. Beginning this fall, students who earn associate degrees in nursing at one of UPMC’s three nursing schools will be able to transfer into Carlow’s Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. “This agreement provides a pathway for our students to further their education,” says Dr. Linda Kmetz, executive director of UPMC Schools of Nursing and director of UPMC Shadyside School of Nursing, in a news release. “Together, we are helping to ensure that future graduates have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in our diverse and changing world.”

 

Categories: Great Minds