CMU App Turns Language-Learning Into a Fun Game

Plus, Stephen Colbert to visit the Pitt campus this fall and a Point Park professor helps preserve WWII veterans' stories.


 


CMU-CREATED APP TURNS TRANSLATIONS INTO LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists Luis von Ahn and Severin Hacker recently launched Duolingo.com for English users to learn Spanish, German or French (or Spanish speakers to learn English).

If a user has trouble recognizing a certain word, Duolingo offers suggestions to help them along and provides alternative translations. By providing rewards such as levels and skill points, the learning process feels more like a game than a lecture.

—PM Editorial Intern James Santelli


PITT TO BRING COLBERT NATION TO THE 'BURGH

Political satirist Stephen Colbert will be trading in the red, white and blue of his Comedy Central set for blue and gold this fall when he visits the University of Pittsburgh campus. Colbert will stop by the campus because an intrepid group of Pitt students were the first to successfully complete the Colbert Super PAC Super Fun Pack treasure hunt.

The Pitt team traveled to the set of "The Colbert Report" in New York City on Thursday, where student Dan Stough appeared in the show's final episode before its two-week summer hiatus. During his appearance, Colbert awarded Stough the hunt's grand prize, a 101-year-old silver turtle-shaped bell.

—PM Assistant Designer Rob McCoy


POINT PARK PROFESSOR HELPS PRESERVE PIECE OF AMERICAN HISTORY

Everyone has their own unique stories to tell, some of which deserve to be carried on. Now, thanks to Point Park University professor Christopher Rolinson, local veterans are telling theirs in a new way.

Rolinson, a photography and photojournalism professor, is capturing area veterans’ images and stories to be used in a documentary for Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh, a nonprofit educational organization that hopes to preserve the stories of American veterans.

"I am privileged to honor these men and women who kept the country safe, and allowed me the opportunity to become a photographer and teacher,” says Rolinson. “Without these folks doing this job, our world, most certainly, would be different today.”

—PM Editorial Intern Caitlin Restelli

Categories: Great Minds