2015 City Guide (Left)

Around the Point

With exciting options for work and play, these Pittsburgh neighborhoods are the places a rising number of urbanites want to call home. Attractive new housing options are popping up to meet the demand of folks young, old and in between who want to take advantage of the easy access to entertainment, an exploding dining scene and iconic city scenery.

The New North

This segment of the city contains PNC Park, which has the distinction of being the most Instagrammed location in Pennsylvania, according to a recent TIME Magazine analysis of Instagram data. And if you’ve sat down for a ballgame and been distracted by the stunning skyline, you know why. But if you venture to this neighborhood only to attend a sporting event or concert, you’re missing out; the area is full of restaurants, museums, cultural landmarks and churches, as well as some lovely historic homes.

The Old Allegheny Slopes

No matter where you drive or walk in The Old Allegheny Slopes, you are probably going up or down a hill. Scarce are flat spots of land in the area that, indeed, has endless slopes. This makes for a lot of good views, along with hidden surprises tucked into these city neighborhoods.

The Northern 'Burbs

The area commonly referred to as the North Hills maintains its long-held status as a fine suburban place to live or go for a walk in a nature park, but the area also offers plenty of shopping and dining and play options. You can find just about any chain business in the country here — but there also are smaller local gems to discover.

The Near East

There’s a reason all of the out-of-town trend pieces praising Pittsburgh’s 21st-century rebirth seem to focus on these neighborhoods. This thriving part of the city is where design, the arts, restaurant culture and high-end shopping are integrated into Pittsburgh’s working-class bones. The character of these communities has remained fundamentally unchanged even as commerce and culture have experienced a time of unprecedented growth.

Where 8 Meets 28

The completed construction on Route 28 makes access to these northern neighborhoods a breeze — which is great because these boroughs increasingly are becoming destinations. The river communities that have been home to many families with histories in steel- and glass-making have a wealth of quaint, independent retail stores, restaurants and businesses, as well as much-loved libraries, festivals and community days enjoyed by locals since well before their neighborhoods were starting to buzz.

Allegheny River Communities

Each borough and municipality in this northeastern corner of Allegheny County contains surprises. To those who live along the river’s edge, they’re familiar, hometown destinations and sights; to visitors, they’re spots worth making the drive out along (the finally construction-free) Route 28. Make a day trip to explore a chunk of the region off the beaten path — you might get so attached that you start thinking about a permanent move up the river.

College Town

When people talk about the revitalization of Pittsburgh, it usually involves the tagline meds and eds — and meds and eds it is in College Town. You’ll find the sprawling buildings of Carnegie Mellon University, Carlow University and the University of Pittsburgh as well as several UPMC medical complexes. Here, you can climb to the top of the second-tallest educational building in the world. Whether you’re working on your degree or visiting someone who is, you’ll never be bored, thanks to a wealth of cultural opportunities.

Green Pittsburgh

Green Pittsburgh is a tour of Pittsburgh’s history, from the old mill communities of Glen Hazel and Hazelwood, up through the immigrant destinations of Greenfield and Squirrel Hill and finally to the mansions of the industrialists in Shadyside. It’s also a story of the birth and rebirth of our city: students and young professionals flock to Squirrel Hill and Shadyside, adding vibrancy that radiates from top universities. Meanwhile, redevelopment in Hazelwood and Glen Hazel aims to reclaim lost potential and offers new chances for affordable housing and a blossoming community.

The Hidden East End

Pittsburgh’s eastern neighborhoods always have shown a broad socioeconomic spectrum, from extravagant wealth to dire poverty. The Mellons, Fricks, Carnegies and Westinghouses built their mansions in this most-stylish part of town. But their departure for greener and more secluded pastures — and the mass relocation of families here after the razing of the Lower Hill — left much of this area economically depressed for decades. Now the long-awaited renaissance of East Liberty is beginning to bring major reinvestment here, too.

The Eastern Border

Most of these communities, which lie to the east of the Squirrel Hill Tunnels, are residential suburbs with small business districts — but don’t take that as a reason not to visit. There’s tons of beauty in these hills, which are packed with historic homes, parks, schools and churches, as well as evidence of Pittsburgh’s steel-making and industrial past, with warehouses, former blast furnaces and brownfields lining the Monongahela River and small waterways such as Turtle Creek.

Around the Point

Home to Pittsburgh's instantly recognizable skyline, rivers and bridges, the area around Point State Park once was the bleeding (literally) western frontier of the United States. Today, it remains the economic heart of the region.

The New North

Museums, historical landmarks, entertainment venues and elegant 19th-century homes pack this section of Pittsburgh’s North Side. The neighborhoods boast a combination of walkable neighborhoods and trendy restaurants.

The Old Allegheny Slopes

You’d be hard-pressed to traverse one of these North Side neighborhoods without going up or down a hill. Take in vistas from high above the city, wander along trails, admire nature and eat to your heart’s content.

The Northern 'Burbs

From historic communities a stone’s throw from the city proper to spacious, booming suburbs with a rural mindset, there’s a hometown for everyone in northern Allegheny County.

The Near East

These 11 communities, which continue to evolve, contain some of the region’s trendiest locally owned restaurants, retail shops and art galleries.

Where 8 Meets 28

The inner ring of Pittsburgh’s suburbs blends some of the best features of the city and the ’burbs — it has good schools and more affordable home prices but also is just a quick jaunt to downtown for work.

Green Pittsburgh

These wealthy suburbs of the Gilded Age now are a series of self-contained communities defined by massive city parks, steep tree-lined hillsides and the Monongahela River.

The Hidden East End

While most people overlook this region of the East End for the better-known neighborhoods of Squirrel Hill and Shadyside, the area we call the Hidden East End slowly is reshaping its future via green space, history-rich buildings and new businesses.

The Eastern Border

With plenty of things to do (and even more interesting things to look at), Pittsburgh’s eastern neighborhoods serve as a reminder of the region’s character and history.