Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

The 4 Best Sports to Try This Spring in Pittsburgh

Looking to switch up your physical activity now that it finally feels like spring? We found four sports you can play locally that you may never have considered.



(page 1 of 2)

Football, hockey and (sometimes) baseball dominate in the Steel City sports scene, but our options don’t end there.

Try your hand at one of these four sports that are alive and thriving in the ‘Burgh.
 

Rugby


photos by Samantha Ashley Tarr
 

For a fast-paced and physically demanding sport, look no further than rugby. Like many sports, the goal of rugby is to score the highest number of points in a match. Players pass the ball laterally or backwards to one another to advance up the field to their opponent’s tryzone. Any player can run with the ball, pass, kick or score.

Rugby is a full contact sport with complete tackles requiring a player to wrap their arms around their opponent before driving them to the ground. A try is scored when the ball is grounded over the opponents’ goal line in the in-goal area. Other points can be scored by penalty kicks, conversion kicks, and drop goals.

The sport has gained traction with youth leagues, high school and college teams, clubs, organizations and tournaments all over the Pittsburgh area. Pittsburgh teams play one another as well as teams across the state and country.
 


 

Interested players can learn more about rugby from the Pittsburgh Forge Rugby Club, the newly merged club by the Pittsburgh Rugby Club and the Pittsburgh Highlanders. The two clubs will play one final match against each other on May 19 before officially becoming one.

“The best part about rugby is it doesn’t really matter what your body type or athletic abilities may be, there will be a spot for you on the field somewhere,” says Angela Smarto, interim president of the Pittsburgh Forge Rugby Club, a title she shares along with interim president Neil Reynolds of Pittsburgh Highlanders.

“When you play rugby, you are part of a bigger community because rugby culture is very social,” says Smarto. “You play your opponents, you shake their hand, and then you feed them for free and they return the favor. It doesn’t matter how good you are, once you’re in, you’re in.”  
 

Handball


photo by Vaidas Brazauskas

A standard handball game features seven players on each team working to score the most goals by handling and throwing the ball using, you guessed it, their hands. Players can pass, hold possession or shoot. If they hold possession, they can dribble or take three steps for up to three seconds without dribbling. Players must shoot from outside the goal area because only the goalkeeper can be within that space.

“I think the reason I play handball is because I can still be physical without the risk of turning an ankle like I would playing basketball or football,” says Andrew Burick, founder of the Pittsburgh Team Handball Club. “It’s harder to get injured playing handball because it’s less jumping up and down and more focus on speed and passing.”  

The Pittsburgh Team Handball Club was founded in 2016 and competes locally with other teams. They do practices and pickup games and see teams go to regional and international tournaments. Because it is an international sport, most popular in Europe, Africa and the Middle East, handball provides the opportunity to network and play with people of all cultures.

“We have people from all over the world and different walks of life that you might otherwise not usually meet,” says Burick. “The Pittsburgh Team Handball Club is very social, good for networking, and gets people together to play this unique sport.”
 

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Edit Module Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

The Latest

Build or Remodel in 2018? Submit Your Home to Our Best of Design Contest

Categories include Best New and Best Renovated homes, Best Kitchens and Best Outdoor Space.

HGTV's Leanne Ford Partners With PPG on Perfect White Paints

Known for her signature "white on white" aesthetic, the star of "Restored by the Fords" shares her "fail proof" color choices.

Halloween in Pittsburgh: How to Embrace the Fright

From haunted houses and scary movies to pumpkin patches and zombie bars –– we are here to help you experience as much of the ghoulish holiday as you dare.

Perspectives: Mourning Without a Road Map

A 30-year-old woman “who had lost her father too soon” learns the importance of following a plan when saying goodbye.

On Fitness: Peace and Posture Instead of No Pain, No Gain

Client by client, personal trainer Ian Riggins is dismantling the aggressive side of the fitness industry.

Angling for Tranquility: The Lure of Kayak Fishing

Kayak fishing is growing in popularity as anglers discover the peaceful joys of casting a line from the water's surface.

MultiStories: Pittsburgh's Art Deco Obelisk – The Gulf Building

As the Gulf Building rose into Pittsburgh skyline in the early 1930s, the prospects of its owner were headed in the opposite direction.

“First Man” Author to Appear at Heinz History Center

James R. Hansen, author of the authorized Neil Armstrong biography, will speak about the astronaut’s life on Nov. 1.

Results Are In: Jobs are Plentiful in Pittsburgh

Glassdoor’s newly released city shortlist for hot jobs ranks Pittsburgh #1.

The 400-Word Review: The Old Man and the Gun

Robert Redford's alleged final performance is a quiet, fitting farewell.

Sandwich, Helmet, Teammates Await Bell’s Return to Steelers

Le’Veon Bell reportedly intends to return to the Steelers before the second Browns game on Oct. 28, but hasn’t yet. But that didn’t stop some of his teammates from trying to have some fun with Bell at the media’s expense.

A New Day for Craft Beer in Pittsburgh

Day Bracey, along with Ed Bailey and Mike Potter, forges a more inclusive approach to craft brewing.

Southern Cuisine Served with a Big Side of Hospitality

Sugar and Smoke owner Andrea Robinson not only wants to feed customers of her new eatery in Bloomfield –– she wants to know their names.

Meet Pittsburgh's 40 Under 40 Honorees for 2018

For two decades, Pittsburgh Magazine and PUMP have presented the annual 40 Under 40 list. And every year, 40 people who have been alive for less than four decades are chosen because of their career accomplishments, dogged volunteer work and commitment to the Pittsburgh region. This year is no different. Read on to learn more about some of our very best neighbors.

Restaurant Review: Pie for Breakfast

Pittsburgh gets an updated, all-day diner with a sense of place from the owners of Legume Bistro and Butterjoint.