Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Teaching Cyber Safety - The Things You Might Not Know

iQ:smartparent’s Cyber Safety segment offers advice on topics such as what to do with “sexted” images you find on your kids’ phones and more.




Photo: shutterstock

 

From a young age, children are taught certain skills to keep themselves safe. Look both ways before crossing the street. Don’t go anywhere with strangers. Don’t stick your fingers in the electrical outlet. But what do they learn about cyber safety? How can children and students protect themselves from online predators, cyber bullies and revenge porn?  

“Cyber-Safety: Privacy, Protection, and the Latest Laws Affecting Children and Families,” produced by WQED’s nationally distributed television program iQ:smartparent and webcast live (video below) on March 9, set out to provide parents, educators, students and children with that knowledge.

Alicia Kozakiewicz, a survivor of internet luring/abduction and child exploitation, shared her story in which an online predator groomed her to gain her trust, abducted her to another state and held her captive before she was rescued by the FBI. She stressed that what happened to her could happen to anyone if they didn’t practice cyber safety, and she urged parents to set boundaries and monitor what their children do online.

Megan Galloway and Kelsey Meacham, data analysts with the Allegheny County Police Department, demonstrated how easy it is to learn intimate details about people from their social media by looking up WQED Producer Gina Catanzarite’s Facebook page. From pictures and comments, they discovered Catanzarite’s husband’s name and that their two sons were adopted from Russia.

“Little pieces of information, we just puzzle them together to get intimate details of your life,” said Meacham. “We know from experience that this is how bad people do it too, unfortunately; they use these same techniques.” 

Steven Dish, a detective in the Allegheny County Police Department Child Abuse /Sex Assault Unit, educated the audience on current ‘sexting’ laws and take-down services that remove sexually explicit images taken or shared without consent. His advice for parents who find ‘sexted’ images on their children’s phone or devices? “Save it, don’t send it and turn the device into the police.” Dish explained that parents will often panic and send the images to their devices, but what that means is they’ve now shared the image and can be charged with distributing child pornography.

Niki Conaway from Mount Lebanon brought her two daughters, Nora and Tessa, to the event because she felt that the face to face conversation with cyber victims and experts, and the ability to ask them questions, would help drive home the importance of cyber safety and literacy.

“I hope this experience makes them more aware that you can be a victim of cyber bullying, harassment and online predators,” says Conaway. “Social media can make you feel safe but hopefully this will open their eyes and cause them to be more aware of what can happen.”
 

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Edit Module Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

The Latest

Our 50 Years: Why I Hate Nostalgia

Enjoying memories is fun – but a far cry from pining for the past.

Perspectives: Finding Grace in #MomLife

A Pittsburgh television reporter learns to embrace the imperfection that comes with being a working mom.

The 400-Word Review: Pledge

IFC Midnight's collegiate terror tale is mostly for genre fans, but it lands a few decent punches.

Capel’s Basketball Resurrection Has the Zoo Rocking Again

Head coach Jeff Capel is restoring respectability and re-establishing the relationship between Pitt’s students and Pitt’s student athletes.

Why Did No One Tell Me Cirque du Soleil is Awesome

A skeptical novice takes in the troupe's "Corteo" production and is stunned at his own delight.

Three Rivers Champion: Julius Boatwright

Boatwright works to connect everyone who needs it with mental health support.

Turkey Devonshire: Reviving a Classic Pittsburgh Sandwich

The once-famous sandwich originated here but now is largely forgotten. We dive into its history and argue that it's time for a revival.

Navigating the Future of Public Transit in Pittsburgh

Six Pittsburghers share their struggles and hopes for the region’s public transit system.

Why Jamison Farm Is a “A Napa Valley for Sheep”

How a former coal miner and his wife use the resources atop rolling Westmoreland County hills to produce the best lamb in the United States.

Pittsburgh Restaurant Review: Fish nor Fowl

The sixth standalone concept from the Richard DeShantz Restaurant Group, is DeShantz’s most exciting restaurant yet.

Our 50 Years: When We Tried to Predict the Future

25 years ago, we predicted what the Pittsburgh of 2019 would look like. We were ... close?

Help Pay Tribute to a Pittsburgh Jazz Legend

Mary Lou Williams began as a teenage piano prodigy in the Hill District and made it to Carnegie Hall and beyond. This month, you can discover her musical legacy.

Their's was a Starry-Eyed Pittsburgh Romance

John Brashear dedicated his life to science — and his wife, Phoebe.

She Became Pittsburgh Radio Royalty by Making Music Matter

Rosemary Welsch, longtime DJ and senior producer at WQEP-FM, has shepherded the station from startup to institution.

He Tries to be a Blessing to Someone Every Day

Doug Williams helps men facing homelessness with hard work — and example.