Girasole

This successful, people-pleasing Italian restaurant in Shadyside, friendly and flavorful, won't rest on its laurels (or sunflowers).



Spinach and ricotta ravioli in a tomato cream sauce.

Photo by Laura Petrilla

(page 1 of 2)

Just a few months after Girasole celebrated its 10th anniversary in April, readers of Pittsburgh magazine voted it the No. 1 Italian (non-chain) restaurant in the region. What better time than now to investigate the secrets to Girasole's success and to learn what's planned for the future?

This small restaurant off Shadyside's Walnut Street offers hearty food in a friendly, upbeat setting. Girasole means "sunflower" in Italian, and it's also close to the surname of the restaurant's owners, who are at the core of the success of their enterprise. Their constant presence, care and welcoming personalities make customers feel at home.

At almost any time of day, you will be greeted and seated by owner Jimmy Gerasole, who opened the restaurant in 2000 with his wife, Patti.  Although he had a background in retail, Jimmy always wanted to open a restaurant.  In 2000, son Gino, who worked at Viaggio Restaurant at the time, found the restaurant's Shadyside space for his parents; he then encouraged them to open the restaurant and came on board as a manager.  Gino's wife, Jennifer, joined them as Girasole's opening chef and continues as executive chef to this day. Jimmy and Patti's other son, Vito, is also an integral part of the restaurant as director of wines, floor manager and a server; he is joined by his wife, Vicki, who occasionally helps out as a server. 

Patti gives special credit to daughter-in-law Jennifer Gerasole: "We think the world of her, and we're lucky to have her both as a daughter-in-law and as our executive chef; she is a very talented chef." Jennifer, a graduate of the former Pennsylvania Institute of Culinary Arts (now Le Cordon Bleu Institute of Culinary Arts in Pittsburgh) establishes the menu and oversees food service and catering. In turn, she credits Chris Corimski, an International Culinary Academy (now also merged into Le Cordon Bleu) graduate who has worked at Girasole for 10 years, with the quality of the day-to-day cooking. Corimski, who has worked in many Pittsburgh restaurants—among them are Casbah and the now-defunct Le Perroquet—reiterates that it is the consistent quality of the food that keeps customers coming back for more. Patti also gives credit to other "wonderful" longtime employees who work hard to meet the needs of customers.

In addition to family, a second key component to Girasole's success is that the restaurant serves plentiful portions of simple food that tastes good. Currently, the dinner menu is divided into primi (first course), pasta and risotto.  In addition, there is one daily special from each of these categories: pollo, pesce and carne. The base menu changes four times a year according to the season.

Upon first glance, the prices might seem high for casual dining, but, in truth, the portions are so large that you are paying for two meals—the one you eat at the restaurant and the leftover meal you take home.

A wine list, which features exclusive Italian wines, accompanies the food selections. They're available by the glass (about three reds and three whites ranging from $8.75 to $10 per glass) or by the bottle (about 25 choices widely ranging from $26 to $250).

Located on Copeland Street in a below-ground space that feels like a grotto, Girasole features an interior of stone walls, wooden accents, copper-topped tables, dried sunflowers and paintings of mostly Italian scenes. During warm months, outdoor seating is available on the front patio.

The atmosphere here is usually bustling, loud and often crowded. A word of advice: Although the restaurant does not take reservations, you may call ahead to put your name on a wait list; that's a wise move for peak hours.

Servers squeeze between the tables, delivering large plates of food generated in a surprisingly small kitchen in the back of the restaurant. Service is quick and attentive, although on two visits, new courses were served before the plates from the previous course were cleared. As in many restaurants, the service is more competent when the restaurant is less crowded.

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Hot Reads

Best of the 'Burgh 2017

Best of the 'Burgh 2017

Host an event in Pittsburgh’s urban sustainable homestead. Join a club for mushroom hunters. Tour a coal mine. Listen to some banjo music. We list our new favorite experiences, food, drink, personalities, stores, items and activities in the ’Burgh.
Daytripping: The ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’

Daytripping: The ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’

Fourteen years ago this month, the mighty Kinzua Viaduct met its match.
Restaurant Review: The Café Carnegie

Restaurant Review: The Café Carnegie

The restaurant, run by Dinette’s Sonja J. Finn, boosts the dining experience at the Carnegie museums in Oakland.
Thrive: Smooth Moves While Getting Lost in the Music

Thrive: Smooth Moves While Getting Lost in the Music

FASTER Pittsburghʼs Hip Hop Cardio promises to get your workout into a groove.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

The 412

See The Tiny House with Room to Grow

See The Tiny House with Room to Grow

The housing company Module, a Pittsburgh start-up, creates an alternative housing model that grows in size as you grow in income.
Watch: Pittsburgh Penguins Video Tribute to Marc-André Fleury

Watch: Pittsburgh Penguins Video Tribute to Marc-André Fleury

With a tear in our eye, we bid the “Flower” Au Revoir.
Finally, a Faster Way From Pittsburgh to Oakland and Beyond

Finally, a Faster Way From Pittsburgh to Oakland and Beyond

A proposed route for new electric buses will connect 30,000 people throughout 24 neighborhoods.
Extras Wanted: Cate Blanchett Shooting Movie in Pittsburgh

Extras Wanted: Cate Blanchett Shooting Movie in Pittsburgh

“Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” a movie based on the best-selling comedic novel, will begin filming in the ‘Burgh next month.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Hot Reads

Best of the 'Burgh 2017

Best of the 'Burgh 2017

Host an event in Pittsburgh’s urban sustainable homestead. Join a club for mushroom hunters. Tour a coal mine. Listen to some banjo music. We list our new favorite experiences, food, drink, personalities, stores, items and activities in the ’Burgh.
Daytripping: The ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’

Daytripping: The ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’

Fourteen years ago this month, the mighty Kinzua Viaduct met its match.
Restaurant Review: The Café Carnegie

Restaurant Review: The Café Carnegie

The restaurant, run by Dinette’s Sonja J. Finn, boosts the dining experience at the Carnegie museums in Oakland.
Thrive: Smooth Moves While Getting Lost in the Music

Thrive: Smooth Moves While Getting Lost in the Music

FASTER Pittsburghʼs Hip Hop Cardio promises to get your workout into a groove.
Curling in Pittsburgh: ‘It's Basically Golf and Chess on Ice’

Curling in Pittsburgh: ‘It's Basically Golf and Chess on Ice’

On the eve of its largest annual event, the Pittsburgh Curling Club has plans to increase Pittsburgh’s appreciation for its intricate sport.
Top Ten Things to Do in Pittsburgh in June

Top Ten Things to Do in Pittsburgh in June

This month's best bets in the ’Burgh.
Edit Module
Edit Module

Edit ModuleShow Tags

On the Blogs


See The Tiny House with Room to Grow

See The Tiny House with Room to Grow

The housing company Module, a Pittsburgh start-up, creates an alternative housing model that grows in size as you grow in income.

Comments


All the foodie news that's fit to blog
Pusadee's Garden Will Close at End of Year (But Not Forever)

Pusadee's Garden Will Close at End of Year (But Not Forever)

Look for some big changes at the Upper Lawrenceville restaurant, which is expected to shutter for at least a year.

Comments


Not just good stuff. Great stuff.
Best Places for Kids on Rainy Days in Pittsburgh

Best Places for Kids on Rainy Days in Pittsburgh

Read on for some under-the-radar ideas on how you and the kids can survive a rainy day this summer.

Comments


High-Wire Acts at Carnegie Science Center

High-Wire Acts at Carnegie Science Center

The North Shore landmark's new ropes course is a draw for adults and youths alike.

Comments


Mike Prisuta's Sports Section

A weekly look at the games people are playing and the people who are playing them.
History Can Wait Until Penguins Are Done Making It

History Can Wait Until Penguins Are Done Making It

The desire for more a year ago helped fuel the Penguins’ quest to repeat this season. Should their thirst for yet another Cup prove as unquenchable next season, there’s no limit to what they might yet achieve. Even a Three-peat.

Comments


Style. Design. Goods. Hide your credit card.
Make the Cut with Jonathan Moran Woodworks

Make the Cut with Jonathan Moran Woodworks

The Strip District-based woodworker's cutting boards can be custom made with the wood of your choice.

Comments


The movies that are playing in Pittsburgh –– and, more importantly, whether or not they're worth your time.
Buckle Up ... Again, as Cars 3 Hits Theaters

Buckle Up ... Again, as Cars 3 Hits Theaters

Reviews of "Cars 3" and "47 Meters Down," plus local movie news and notes.

Comments


Everything you need to know about getting married in Pittsburgh today.
Enchanting Summery Trends to Illuminate Your Wedding Palette

Enchanting Summery Trends to Illuminate Your Wedding Palette

You’ll definitely want to pin these new summer wedding trends to your Pinterest board.

Comments


Weekly inspiration for your home from the editors of Pittsburgh Magazine
Blooming: Pittsburgh Botanic Garden Hosts Town & Country Tour

Blooming: Pittsburgh Botanic Garden Hosts Town & Country Tour

From a forest of Japanese maples to a rocky urban sanctuary, the annual tour covers 14 very different gardens across the East End.

Comments


The hottest topics in higher education
Visit Thiel College for a Summer BBQ

Visit Thiel College for a Summer BBQ

On three days this summer, the college will host visit days for prospective students.

Comments

Edit Module