Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

The 10 Brands That Built Pittsburgh



(page 9 of 11)

U.S. STEEL

The United States Steel Corporation isn’t just a brand that built Pittsburgh; it’s a brand that built America.

Landmarks, buildings and bridges from coast to coast have been constructed with the company’s products for more than a century. Created on the bones of seven previous companies (including Andrew Carnegie’s Carnegie Steel Company), U.S. Steel’s pedigree was impressive, containing investment and interest from some of the richest industrialists in the world; its success was immediate and enduring.

Diversification in the 1980s led to a name change, as U.S. Steel temporarily became a subsidiary of the larger USX corporation; a restructuring in the early 2000s did away with that brand, and the company’s facilities and landmarks in the area (such as the iconic U.S. Steel Tower in Downtown Pittsburgh) once again bear the U.S. Steel name.

And while the Steel City can’t boast the number of mills and steelworkers it did at one time, the company’s bustling Mon Valley Works operations in Clairton, Braddock and West Mifflin keep the region’s industrial heritage alive; between those facilities and the company’s headquarters and research centers, more than 4,000 people in the Pittsburgh area work for U.S. Steel.
 


At the time of its incorporation, U.S. Steel became the largest business enterprise in history. The years that followed saw manufacturing begin in Pittsburgh (above) and spread around the world and, much later, the construction of the company’s iconic headquarters (below, still under construction) Downtown.
 

  • Upon its incorporation in 1901, U.S. Steel became the largest business enterprise in the history of the world. The new company was valued at $1.4 billion.
     
  • It didn’t take long for U.S. Steel to start producing a staggering amount of steel. In its first full year of operation, the company was responsible for 67 percent of domestic steel output.
     
  • A (very) partial list of structures that contain U.S. Steel: the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, Rockefeller Center and the Chicago Picasso statue.
     
  • U.S. Steel also can count three Emmy Awards among its accomplishments. The anthology series dubbed “The United States Steel Hour,” which showcased some of “Twilight Zone” creator Rod Serling’s early work, won statues in 1954 and ’55.
     
  • The Pittsburgh Steelers logo is an adaptation of the Steelmark logo created by U.S. Steel in 1960. U.S. Steel eventually turned over the rights to the logo to the American Iron and Steel Institute; the Steelers petitioned the institute to allow them to change “Steel” to “Steelers” inside the emblem.
     
  • When it was built, the U.S. Steel Tower, Downtown, was the tallest building between New York and Chicago, at 841 feet. U.S. Steel recently renewed its lease on the property and will remain headquartered Downtown through at least 2028.
     


 

“It was a very close, tight and important relationship, because Pittsburgh was built with steel. You look at the history of Pittsburgh and the history of U.S. Steel and how it came together with Carnegie and all those guys coming together to create U.S. Steel — and industrial America virtually having its beginning here in Pittsburgh. And a city of neighborhoods bringing in all of these people ... who all came here to Pittsburgh to work in the steel mills ... [a large percentage] of the steel in the world was made in Pittsburgh, and U.S. Steel was the No. 1 steel maker in the world. It was a family; it was a tight family. It’s still iconic ... It was a very tight and proud relationship, and it created a lot of jobs. My late brother Larry, his first job in public relations was working for U.S. Steel. They hired good people ... There’s never been a corporation quite as connected to Pittsburgh quite like U.S. Steel ... If you were talking to people out of town, it was partially because of the Steelers, but because of U.S. Steel, [Pittsburgh is known as] an industrial town. U.S. Steel being so tightly connected to us and the steelworkers — we like that tough, gritty, real-people feel. And we’re still proud of it.”
— Ray Werner, former creative director, Ketchum Communications; founder, Werner Chepelsky​

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module


 

    

    

   

   

   


Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Hot Reads

Pittsburgh MultiStories: Pittsburgh's Oldest Surviving Skyscraper

Pittsburgh MultiStories: Pittsburgh's Oldest Surviving Skyscraper

The 15-story Park Building and the 14-story Carnegie building went up in the the late 1800s just a block away from each other Downtown. Today, only the Park Building still stands.
Restaurant Review: or, The Whale

Restaurant Review: or, The Whale

The Downtown restaurant is a captivating, if costly, catch.
Celebrating 5 Pittsburghers Who Built Careers Behind the Bar

Celebrating 5 Pittsburghers Who Built Careers Behind the Bar

Pittsburgh is a city that celebrates its neighborhood bars. In some of those spots, second- and third-generation regulars are pulling up their stools to be served by someone who started pouring drinks decades ago.
Second Chances: Crossroads in the Kitchen

Second Chances: Crossroads in the Kitchen

People working to overcome substance abuse problems and ex-offenders discover a welcoming environment in restaurant kitchens.
How to Pamper Yourself in Pittsburgh

How to Pamper Yourself in Pittsburgh

Looking to beat the winter doldrums? We round up the best places and experiences for a little personal indulgence.
The Growing Popularity of Shooting a Clay Pigeon

The Growing Popularity of Shooting a Clay Pigeon

Skeet shooting is taking off as a favored western Pennsylvania hobby.
Top 10 Things to Do in January in Pittsburgh

Top 10 Things to Do in January in Pittsburgh

This month's best bets in the 'Burgh.
Edit Module

Edit ModuleShow Tags


Print Magazine-Subscribe/Renew

Print Magazine-Subscribe/Renew

Order a new print subscription or renew your current Pittsburgh magazine subscription

Comments

Ton Pottery Back in Business

Ton Pottery Back in Business

The ceramics teaching studio has moved from Lawrenceville to a bigger space in Millvale.

Comments

Making His Mark in Pittsburgh Restaurants

Making His Mark in Pittsburgh Restaurants

Mark F. Flaherty, one of the nation’s most prominent liquor lawyers, is passionate about Pittsburgh restaurants.

Comments

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Valentina Vavasis

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Valentina Vavasis

Valentina Vavasis is Owner of Valentina Vavasis Consulting and Pittsburgh Vernacular and an adjunct professor at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture.

Comments

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Melissa Kawai

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Melissa Kawai

Melissa Kawai is Vice President of Max Construction Company, Frie-Max Management, LLC, Fox Chapel Sea Ray, Inc. and South Side Marina, Inc.

Comments

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Holly Bulvony

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Holly Bulvony

Holly Bulvony is Senior Vice President of Communications of A to Z Communications.

Comments

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Erin Gibson Allen

Women & Business Feb. 2018: Erin Gibson Allen

Erin Gibson Allen is an attorney at Marcus & Shapira.

Comments

The Mister Rogers Documentary Has Debuted at Sundance

The Mister Rogers Documentary Has Debuted at Sundance

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” takes viewers beyond the cardigan collection and into “the heart of a creative genius.”

Comments

The Original Score from “Jaws” on Vinyl? Yeah, We Got That

The Original Score from “Jaws” on Vinyl? Yeah, We Got That

Vinyl Remains in Dormont is not interested in offering an endless variety of records, but what you will discover are rarities, classics and hard-to-find curiosities.

Comments

Pittsburgh MultiStories: Pittsburgh's Oldest Surviving Skyscraper

Pittsburgh MultiStories: Pittsburgh's Oldest Surviving Skyscraper

The 15-story Park Building and the 14-story Carnegie building went up in the the late 1800s just a block away from each other Downtown. Today, only the Park Building still stands.

Comments