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Best Renovation

Cory Cope and Jennifer Owen spent 10 years renovating a former power station on the North Side into their dream home.



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photos by cory morton

 

When Cory Cope and Jennifer Owen first laid eyes on the more-than-century-old former power station in Perry South, it was hardly anyone’s idea of a dream house. 

The empty brick building was painted a heinous shade of green, a previous mudslide had filled a back room with dirt, and water from the surrounding hillside flowed into the building like a stream before emptying into a drain in the floor. Most of the windows were either boarded up or missing. There were holes in the roof.   

The couple, who own Flyspace Productions, an event management and production company that produces events such as the Three Rivers Arts Festival and Picklesburgh, weren’t turned off, though. In fact, they instantly fell in love with the place. 

“We pulled up and I said, ‘We’re buying this place,’ without even seeing the inside,” Cope recalls. “After seeing the inside, it should have deterred us, but it did not.”
 



 

That was 10 years ago. In the decade since, Cope and Owen have spent nearly all of their nights and weekends, every moment they could spare — and some they couldn’t — making the commercial building, which once powered the Federal Street trolley and later spent time as a print shop, into a home. 

Last April, the couple finally moved into the 3,000-square-foot building, which is on track to become Platinum LEED certified as a single family home, the first in Pittsburgh and possibly the first adaptive reuse project registered in the state, according to Owen. 

Most of the features that make it LEED certified, including insulation and sealing that make the home airtight, cannot be seen, but it’s the home’s more obvious attractions, such as the original exposed brick, ductwork, sleek modern kitchen and overall industrial-chic aesthetic that catches the eye, including those of Pittsburgh Magazine’s panel of judges, who named it Best Renovated Home for 2018

“You could just tell what was new and what was existing,” says Stephanie Schill Hayden, an architect at Schill Architecture and a designer at House of L Interior Design. “They made them harmonious together, but they didn’t try to cover up what was already there. They used the structural walls. It was neat.” 
 

The Process. 
When Cope and Owen bought the building in 2008, they thought they would spend a year, maybe two, renovating it. Never did they imagine it would take a decade, but the couple — who married in 2010 — did everything themselves as time and money allowed, even as friends and family called them crazy. 

“I think both of us have always just been the type where when we decide we want to do something, we put our heads down and do it,” says Cope, a 2012 Pittsburgh Magazine “40 Under 40” winner. “If there are bumps in the road, we keep going.”  

Partway through the process, the couple, who ended up purchasing a small house in nearby Marshall-Shadeland to live in as they renovated the house on Federal Street, also decided to go for the Platinum LEED certification. This caused them to rethink their plans for the property. 

“We had to put the brakes on for a second and re-evaluate everything we were doing,” Owen says. “So not only did it take a minute to replan our building, but we also had to add a whole lot more to the process.”

One of their first steps was to repair and add a new roof to the building to stop the numerous leaks. They also began the arduous process of removing the paint, which Owen describes as a “hospital green” color, from the bricks. 

The couple briefly considered hiring someone to sandblast the building, which only would have taken a few days, but after finding out the high price, they decided to do it themselves — by hand. 

Using angle grinders, Cope, Owen and Cope’s dad — who traveled in from Johnstown on weekends to help them throughout the renovation — spent six months grinding paint from every single brick in the home. 
 

“It was extremely time consuming,” Cope says. “You could only do it for so long before you couldn’t take it anymore.” 

Breaking things into systems, the couple also ran electrical into the building, which had no outlets, and added plumbing. The home’s downstairs living room retains its original concrete floor, but Cope and Owen were forced to tear up the floor in what would become the kitchen and bathrooms to run water lines. 

“We tried to keep as much of the character of this place as we could,” Cope says. “We didn’t try to hide some of the rougher areas of it because I think that’s why the building is so cool.”

The industrial feel carries into the first-floor master bedroom and bathroom. Where there once was a garage door, the couple added a giant window. Just outside is an outdoor patio, which used to be the building’s boiler room, and the space still retains the original chimney. 
 


 

A walk-through closet leads to the master bathroom, where Cope and Owen added radiant heating under the concrete floors. Concrete also was used to create the sink and a giant, 40-inch-tall corner tub the couple poured in place themselves after building the molds from wood. 

“You can float in it,” Owen says. “My stipulation for a tub was I didn’t want to have to choose between my knees and my shoulders being underwater.”

The open-concept bathroom doesn’t have a traditional shower. Instead, a giant shower head, called the "Pipe” by Italian company Boffi, stands in the middle of the room. 

“It’s pretty luxurious,” Owen says of the oversized fixture, which the couple purchased shortly after buying the house and waited nine years to install. “It was our big splurge, really, for the entire house.”  

Judges praised the couple’s style choices, which carry throughout the house.

“The plumbing fixtures enhance the industrial modern aesthetic,” says Jodi van der Wiel, an associate design director at Cleveland-based Vocon architecture and interior design firm. “It fits really well in the space.”

The bathroom ceiling also is covered with custom wood panels created using 100-year-old redwood that was pulled out of an old hunting cabin in Ligonier; the couple ran it through a planer to restore it to its original beauty. Most of the wood found throughout the home, including bookshelves built from an old stage, are pieces the couple found and repurposed. 

“We would search Craigslist and Construction Junction,” Cope says. “Any time we thought there was something we could use, we’d buy it and stick it in a storage trailer that we had out front until not long ago.” 

The couple designed all of the home’s doors, which have a custom metal skin or wood inlay fabricated by Technique Architectural Products in Wilkinsburg. The company also created the home’s indoor and outdoor railings and made the custom indoor bent steel staircase that leads to the second floor. 
 

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2018 Best of Design Winners

Best New Home

A mountain-modern home built into the hillside of a reclaimed mining site has become the dream home for a family of five.

Best Renovation

Cory Cope and Jennifer Owen spent 10 years renovating a former power station on the North Side into their dream home.

Best Bathroom Renovation

Interior designer Lauren Levant turned a dated master bathroom into a sleek sanctuary.

Best New Kitchen

Inspired by a sweeping view of the Allegheny River, Cyd Stackhouse and Bob Bergren incorporated water into every design choice of their modern, ethereal kitchen.

Best Kitchen Renovation

With help from HGTV star Leanne Ford, former NFL player Gus Frerotte and his wife, Ann, created a cozy, timeless kitchen in their century-old Oakmont home.

Best Outdoor Space

Wanting to extend their living space, a Mt. Lebanon couple added an inviting porch to their 1920s-era home.

Meet Our Judges

To ensure fairness and neutrality, a panel of Cleveland-based professionals in the design and architecture industries handled this year’s judging process.
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