The Pet Lover's Guide

From dog yoga to “pet resorts,” local pooches, kittens and other furry friends can have it all.



(page 2 of 4)

Doga!
Leta Koontz and Laurie Held generated a buzz in 2004 when they launched “doga” (aka dog yoga) at Schoolhouse Yoga in Lawrenceville. Surprising as it sounded, the idea of yoga for dogs made perfect sense to caring pet owners who know the importance of exercise and stretching — especially for older canines.

The trend caught on, popping up in a few other cities around the country, and Koontz has continued offering doga at her studio and also through Animal Friends, where she teaches several times a year. You can also find doga classes at Misty Pines Dog Park.


The swimming areas at Lucky Paws, Paws Here A While and Misty Pines are all available to doggie day-care visitors, and aquatic dogs can also explore a gorgeous outdoor trail at Frick Park that offers a creek with a dam. Canines are welcome to romp in that, but Dr. Doug Knueven points out that stagnant outdoor water (think creeks or ponds) can harbor bacteria called leptosporosis.

Though he’s not a fan of frequent pet vaccination, he suggests outdoor pets be protected from this harmful bacteria. If you'd like your pet to swim for a good cause, the Dormont Pool hosts an annual pet-centric fundraiser during Labor Day weekend, where dogs take over the historic pool. Big and small pooches are kept in separate areas for safety, but all of them have a chance to play.

Go Ham!
Small furry creatures can be great low-maintenance pets for children. They generally cost somewhere between $10 and $25, and only need their cages cleaned once a week. But caring for hamsters, gerbils, rabbits and guinea pigs requires a gentle (and recently washed) hand.

The folks at Seahorse pet store (724/443-2920) in Hampton Township tell us that kids must always wash their hands before handling a hamster or gerbil because the scent of something they’ve recently eaten could cause the animal to bite. Kids also need to be careful not to drop, squeeze or step on their critter if it jumps out of their hands.  


Don’t get your feathers ruffled when considering a bird as a pet. Avian companions live in a relatively small space indoors; they are inexpensive to feed and rarely require vet care. But, as with any pet, don’t just wing it: Seek advice from bird owners or shops specializing in birds before thinking about buying one for the first time.

Donn Blosser, owner of Pretty Birds in Millvale, offers a simple rule for beginners: Purchasing a bird needs to be family commitment. The life span of a bird is proportionate to its size (a small one lives eight to 10 years, and the larger birds can live as many as 80).

Parakeets or cockatiels are reasonable choices for a novice. Decide whether you prefer an “interactive” bird (one that talks and likes to be handled) or a more hands-off bird (like a finch or canary, which serenades you with its song but never leaves its cage). Also, consider your noise-tolerance level.

“All birds will make noise,” says Blosser, but some, like conures, are likely to squawk more than others. — Mike May

■ Pretty Birds: 412/822-8082, prettybirds.net


For many pets, a trip to the groomer is a no-brainer. After getting a quick bath in warm, sudsy water, followed by a blast from the blow-dryer, they happily head home. But for our youngest and oldest furry friends, Amy Swickline, owner of Animal Elegance, has some valuable advice: For new pets, “start them out with grooming as young as possible,” she says, “to get them used to it.” This can start at home by gently brushing their fur before segueing to grooming appointments for the most basic services — a bath with nail and ear trim.

While hanging out at home, play with your puppy’s feet, Swickline says, massaging the paw pads or rubbing between the toes so your pup won’t be surprised when a groomer touches their feet.

As your pet grows and grooming visits get more familiar, perhaps add extras like a de-shedding treatment. Animal Elegance uses all-natural cleaning products and offers cat and dog grooming services.

Over at A Diamond in the Ruff, you can get your pet freshly cleaned with the help of staffers, who also offer a “scent of the month” to improve the fragrance of your furry friend; some of their other spa services include the ever-popular blueberry facial treatment.

UrbanDog has a soothing Dead Sea mineral mud scrub — and, for those unfortunate wildlife encounters, a “de-skunkifying treatment.”

The Pet Salon, home of the quick “Splash and Dash for Dogs,” offers a flat rate for unlimited monthly dog bathing, shampooing, blow drying and brushing.

■ Animal Elegance: 412/361-1177, animal-elegance.com
■ A Diamond in the Ruff: 412/381-2200, diamondintheruff.com
■ UrbanDog: 412/782-2200, urbandogusa.com
■ The Pet Salon: 412/279-5331, petsalonusa.com

The Creative Cat, Pet Blogger
Seeking information and advice on all things feline? Look no further than the photo-filled blog at thecreativecat.net. Artist and writer Bernadette Kazmarski posts sketches and adorable photos of her ever-growing cat family daily, and shares valuable information on local pet resources, adoptions, fostering and more.

Hot Reads

Made in Pittsburgh

Made in Pittsburgh

The city of steel always has been known for its industry – what we make. Today, that defining characteristic expands beyond manufacturing into every aspect of modern life: to technology, clothing, home goods and unique food and drink products as well.
Ed Piskor is Pittsburgh's Hip-Hop Historian

Ed Piskor is Pittsburgh's Hip-Hop Historian

While he can walk largely unrecognized in his hometown, comic-book artist Ed Piskor of Munhall continues to win critical acclaim and international fame with “Hip Hop Family Tree,” a series of graphic novels telling the story of hip-hop music.
Review: Sienna Mercato

Review: Sienna Mercato

Matthew Porco, one of our Chefs of the Year, designs the menus at Sienna Mercato's downtown establishments.
An Open Letter to Local Sports Reporters

An Open Letter to Local Sports Reporters

PittGirl has had enough of the criticism of fanatics and asks the media to stop labeling everyone.

The 412

Bryant McFadden Wants to Talk to You

Bryant McFadden Wants to Talk to You

The former Steelers cornerback joins the 120 Sports team to keep you up to speed on all things sporting.
Celebrate Our 'Up-and-Coming Nightlife City' Status With Pittsburgh Cocktail Week

Celebrate Our 'Up-and-Coming Nightlife City' Status With Pittsburgh Cocktail Week

Raise a glass to another 'Burgh superlative at these awesome cocktail parties.
Pittsburgh is One of the Most Cycling-Friendly U.S. Cities

Pittsburgh is One of the Most Cycling-Friendly U.S. Cities

Bicycling mag ranks the Steel City at No. 21 on its list of 50 metropolises.
Thrival Festival Rocked Bakery Square 2.0

Thrival Festival Rocked Bakery Square 2.0

Relive the two-day event that was part innovation and part musical brilliance.

Hot Reads

Made in Pittsburgh

Made in Pittsburgh

The city of steel always has been known for its industry – what we make. Today, that defining characteristic expands beyond manufacturing into every aspect of modern life: to technology, clothing, home goods and unique food and drink products as well.
Ed Piskor is Pittsburgh's Hip-Hop Historian

Ed Piskor is Pittsburgh's Hip-Hop Historian

While he can walk largely unrecognized in his hometown, comic-book artist Ed Piskor of Munhall continues to win critical acclaim and international fame with “Hip Hop Family Tree,” a series of graphic novels telling the story of hip-hop music.
Review: Sienna Mercato

Review: Sienna Mercato

Matthew Porco, one of our Chefs of the Year, designs the menus at Sienna Mercato's downtown establishments.
Film Noir Fall Fashion

Film Noir Fall Fashion

Fall into autumn with a fashion landscape awash in black, white and nifty shades of gray.
An Open Letter to Local Sports Reporters

An Open Letter to Local Sports Reporters

PittGirl has had enough of the criticism of fanatics and asks the media to stop labeling everyone.
8 Foodie Day Trips (and a Few Weekends, Too)

8 Foodie Day Trips (and a Few Weekends, Too)

Hoping to take a leaf-peeping road trip? Keep food at the top of your priority list and consult our lineup of eight destinations, most within 150 miles of the city.
Advertisement