90 Neighborhoods and What We Love About Them

Explore the ins and outs of Pittsburgh’s incredible, diverse neighborhoods with fun things to do in every part of town.



(page 10 of 10)


 

South Side Flats

Everything about The Smiling Moose is just a step better than Carson Street’s par. Sure, as do many bars, the menu focuses on sandwiches, sliders and snacks. But this isn’t your usual pub grub; try a shrimp po’boy with roasted red pepper mayo, red cabbage slaw and corn salsa. Yes, there’s a lot of beer and mixed drinks, but not your watered-down, by-the-bucket libations — more like a mighty, I.P.A.-focused beer list and creative cocktails named for horror-movie icons. Even the patronage is a little more refined; you’ll find familiar regulars and out-of-town visitors dropping in on the strength of The Moose’s growing reputation as an island of reliability in the chaotic South Side. Upstairs, the bar regularly hosts punk and indie concerts and comedy shows in a unique space with a towering stage (and satellite bar around the corner). Downstairs, regular features that include comedy and music open-mic nights and trivia competitions pull loyal followings. Ravenous Pens fans know that The Moose is one of the premier hockey bars in town, with all eyes on the giant projection screen as soon as the puck drops. The South Side seems to morph and change every year or so, sometimes for the better and sometimes not. A few institutions stay reliably great no matter what’s going on outside, though, and The Smiling Moose might be the best of them. — Sean Collier

[1306 E. Carson St.; smiling-moose.com, 412/431-4668]

 

Allentown

Owned by entrepreneurs Jonathan and Brandy Vlasic, cozy and romantic Alla Famiglia offers a menu that may include such Italian dishes as veal chop Milanese, caprese salad and mussels Diavola. — Kristina Martin

[allafamiglia.com]

 


 

Arlington Heights

You can't quite smack a home run off the U.S. Steel Tower from Arlington Ballfield, but you can pretend.

 

Knoxville

The Council of the Three Rivers American Indian Center was formed by a pair of local Native American families to strengthen ties with others in the Pittsburgh area. The group runs several Head Start/pre-kindergarten centers, including one in Knoxville. — Sean Collier

[cotraic.org]

 


 

Arlington

The South Hills Racing Pigeon Club dates back to the early 1900s; club pigeons were once recruited for military service.

 

Beltzhoover

It takes more than tennis courts and bike racks to make a good city park. Sometimes, you need to come up with a unique draw — say, a free-to-the-public skateboard park within a few minutes of downtown. McKinley Skate Park in Beltzhoover, not a mile from Saw Mill Run Boulevard, is equipped with half- and quarter-pipes, rails and ramps for your skateboarding, biking or other wheeled needs. Haven’t dusted off that board since Tony Hawk’s glory days? Head to Beltzhoover and see if you remember how to ollie. Got little ones who tend more toward the X Games than the Little League? Buy some elbowpads and get ’em skating. — Sean Collier

[Bausman Street, near Saw Mill Run Boulevard intersection; pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/skate-parks]

 


 

Mount Oliver

Bring the kids (or the pups) for an evening stroll around Philip Murray Playground.

 

Saint Clair

In one of Pittsburgh’s most troubled neighborhoods, Lighthouse Cathedral of Pittsburgh works tirelessly for its congregation. Meetings, church programs, outreach efforts and youth classes fill the calendar year-round. — Sean Collier

[lighthousepa.com]

 

South Side Slopes

On the one hand, Corner Café is a solid little dive on the South Side Slopes. Pints are cheap, service is dependable and, really, what more could you ask for? But Corner Café is also a kind of speakeasy for stand-up comedians. Its small stage hosts a wide range of wise guys, from amateurs working their first mic to local stars plying their craft. As Pittsburgh’s independent comedy scene grows, Corner Café is becoming a favorite stop on our little vaudeville circuit. The Slopes have been home to crackups and storytellers for 200 years; it’s only natural to give ’em a spotlight. — Robert Isenberg

[2500 S. 18th St.; 412/488-2995]

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

City Guide 2013:

'Which Neighborhood Should I Live In?'

'Which Neighborhood Should I Live In?'

We pick the perfect neighborhood for six breeds of ’Burgher.
How to Become an iPhone Photography Pro

How to Become an iPhone Photography Pro

Smartphone technology is enabling photographers to discover and illuminate hidden pieces of Pittsburgh. Here’s how they do it — and how you can start.
City Guide: Arts + Entertainment

City Guide: Arts + Entertainment

We outline the local arts in a wide range of categories to remind you why Pittsburgh is an arts mecca.
7 Things You Might Not Know About Pittsburgh

7 Things You Might Not Know About Pittsburgh

Strap on an Indiana Jones fedora and journey through the mysteries of the past with PittGirl.

⬇ Choose Your Region










 

⬇ Did we miss something?

When we set out to find something we loved in every single city neighborhood, we hit an early hurdle: how should we define them? Pittsburghers have long held different definitions of where certain 'hoods end and others begin — as has the city itself, changing official designations more than once.

In the end, we decided to swear by the most recent city maps. That does make for some odd quirks of designation, but we felt it was the only fair standard we could apply.

And while we do love all 90 of our choices, each neighborhood could've provided 90 more — the selections presented here are by no means the best part of their respective neighborhoods, just one of many great components. We're eager to here about your favorite features and landmarks, so let us know: what's your favorite part of your favorite neighborhood?

Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags

Hot Reads

Review: Salt of the Earth

Review: Salt of the Earth

Brandon Fisher is the latest chef behind Salt of the Earth’s modern-American dishes.
2014 Pittsburgher of the Year Award: The Fred Rogers Company

2014 Pittsburgher of the Year Award: The Fred Rogers Company

Sharing the DNA of the father of children’s television, the Fred Rogers Company reinvigorates a beloved legacy while creating new hit characters and content that help children to grow, giggle and learn.
Update: The McMutrie Sisters' Mission 5 Years After the Haiti Earthquake

Update: The McMutrie Sisters' Mission 5 Years After the Haiti Earthquake

Jamie and Ali McMutrie were PM's 2010 Pittsburghers of the Year after airlifting 54 youngsters to safety. Now, they have forged a relationship with a major global player to continue their work to prevent struggling Haitian families from surrendering children to orphanages.
PittGirl's New Year's Resolutions for Pittsburghers

PittGirl's New Year's Resolutions for Pittsburghers

Four ways to make the city even better in 2015.
Penguins Profile: The Fearless Patric Hornqvist

Penguins Profile: The Fearless Patric Hornqvist

The Penguin winger fits in easily with the team, thanks to his infectious personality and his mad dedication to confounding opposing goaltenders.
Rev It Up: This South Side Pittsburgh Loft is Unique and Unusual

Rev It Up: This South Side Pittsburgh Loft is Unique and Unusual

This three-story home melds all of the comforts of home with the sleek look and efficiency of industrial design.
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit Module