90 Neighborhoods and What We Love About Them

Explore the ins and outs of Pittsburgh’s incredible, diverse neighborhoods with fun things to do in every part of town.



(page 6 of 10)


 

North Shore

The Outfield Reserved seats at PNC Park, on top of the right-field wall (sections 142-145) give you a nice perch that offers a near-perfect perspective for a baseball game — plus, they’re reasonably priced (usually around $25). — Pat Lackey

[pirates.com]

 

Chateau

Rivers Casino is our hub of everlasting nightlife and constant gaming — with beer and a giant buffet. In a city that finds pride in going to bed early, it’s nice to have a place that’s welcoming at all hours. Rivers has a solution for even the most cash-strapped gamer: the penny slots. One-cent slot machines present more than just a way to go to the casino with about six bucks in your pocket, though; they’re also a great way to extend a trip. One of the best things about the last outpost of the revitalized North Shore is how it complements nearby activities. Stop at Rivers Casino before a Pirates game, dinner at Hyde Park or a concert at Stage AE … or wander over for a nightcap. Take advantage of the ample and often free parking at Rivers: Play a few hands of blackjack and then head over to Heinz Field or PNC Park for a game. The table games are great — with old-school Vegas class and low minimum bets — but for some, the endless maze of slot machines is still the main event at Rivers. This is the kind of place where you stop in, get some food, play some games and go home happy, win or lose. It’s quickly become part of the downtown landscape. — Sean Collier

[777 Casino Drive; theriverscasino.com, 412/231-7777]

 

Manchester

Tucked cozily into Liverpool Street on the North Side, Manchester Academic Charter School offers a diverse lineup of programs for local youths, including a robotics team (an appealing group for young ’Burghers to join). — Sean Collier

[macsk8.org]

 

Allegheny West

When Ed Menzer made a trip to Puerto Rico, he fell hook, line and sinker for the Spanish parador — buildings retrofitted for overnight stay. In 2005, Menzer purchased a North Side mansion built by industrialist Joshua Rhodes in 1870 that already had been turned into a bed and breakfast; Menzer took a little more than a year to renovate the 8,000-square-foot property before opening it to the public. The original paradors are meant to blend into their surrounding communities, which the Parador Inn’s exterior does. The interiors, though, are inspired by Hemingway’s Key West, bringing a little bit of tropical paradise to a city not known for cool ocean breezes. Menzer (and his dogs Razor and RJ) host nine different rooms and suites at $150 per night (though a Saturday-night-only stay is $200). While the prices are consistent throughout, accommodations range from 328 to 869 square feet and from single rooms to multilevel suites. Access to the nearby YMCA is included in the cost. The Parador is conveniently located near the stadiums and the casino, and it is a modest walk from the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, downtown and the Strip. If you visit the Parador website, check out weather-related deals, as well as discounts for local attractions. For those so inclined, Menzer also maintains an active history-fun-fact-laden blog, which gives visitors a taste of his personality. — Amy Whipple

[939 Western Ave.; theparadorinn.com, 412/231-4800]

 


 

Allegheny Center

We’re pretty sure there’s no way to count the number of great Pittsburgh spots for a wedding reception. We can, however, tally the locations that come with a penguin (not the hockey-playing kind) as a greeter: one. That would be The National Aviary, where — in addition to both indoor and outdoor venues and complimentary access to the Aviary’s exhibits for your guests — you can upgrade your reception package to include one of the North Side landmark’s famous African penguins, which will waddle and generally act adorable on your special day. Just be sure to keep your speeches PG-rated, lest the parrots learn a few new phrases. — Sean Collier

[700 Arch St.; aviary.org, 412/323-7235]

 

California-Kirkbride

So you want to build yourself a garden. You’ve never planted so much as a chia seed, but you’re pretty sure your thumb is green. Where do you start? May we suggest The Urban Gardener, a one-stop shop for amateur horticulture? You can find every kind of gardening equipment and decoration, and you can also get a crash course in fertilizers, organic pest control, rain barrels and cultivation techniques. Established in 1997 in a converted gas station, Urban Gardener offers on-site consultation, sending employees to your house to assess what you’re doing. If you’re really struggling, they’ll even handle weeding and pruning for you. You can attend one of the store’s regular seminars or pick up a birdbath for your newly landscaped yard. California-Kirkbride may seem like an odd location for such an agrarian business, but it’s ideal: Urban gardening makes sense in the inner city, where old properties are finding new purpose. This turn-of-the-century town is just beginning to put down new roots, and like the nearby Mexican War Streets, California-Kirkbride could blossom at any moment. It’s never too late to start a flowerbed or raise some herbs. Just as this humble little neighborhood can reinvent itself, so too can the average city slicker grow life from the dirt. — Robert Isenberg

[1901 Brighton Road; urbangardenerpgh.com, 412/323-GROW]

 

Perry South (Perry Hilltop)

What started as a three-week summer work-camp in 1985 became by 1993 a year-round community center. The Rev. Saleem Ghubril founded the Pittsburgh Project as a way to both spread the Christian faith and to reconcile racial tensions. The project has a year-round staff of 29 to serve 300 kids and teenagers who use its services. It also boasts an annual participation of 2,700 people who charge nothing to repair homes owned by the elderly. After-school and summer youth development programs focus on creating “servant leaders” through academic success, healthy relationships with adults and peers, transformation of the culture around them and service to others. These are available to all K-12 students at a cost of $150 per student for a five-day-a-week program that runs through the school year. Home repair draws volunteers from across the country, with camps available during the year. Pittsburgh Project is housed in a converted school building, which includes classrooms, as well as a 275-seat sanctuary, a 324-bed guesthouse, a recreation room, café, dining hall and a 20-seat meeting room/art gallery. The project runs the neighboring Fowler Park and Pool in addition to a 1.5-acre urban farm and the Charles Street farmers market. — Amy Whipple

[2801 N. Charles St.; pittsburghproject.org, 412/321-1678]

City Guide 2013:

'Which Neighborhood Should I Live In?'

'Which Neighborhood Should I Live In?'

We pick the perfect neighborhood for six breeds of ’Burgher.
How to Become an iPhone Photography Pro

How to Become an iPhone Photography Pro

Smartphone technology is enabling photographers to discover and illuminate hidden pieces of Pittsburgh. Here’s how they do it — and how you can start.
7 Things You Might Not Know About Pittsburgh

7 Things You Might Not Know About Pittsburgh

Strap on an Indiana Jones fedora and journey through the mysteries of the past with PittGirl.
City Guide: Arts + Entertainment

City Guide: Arts + Entertainment

We outline the local arts in a wide range of categories to remind you why Pittsburgh is an arts mecca.

⬇ Choose Your Region










 

⬇ Did we miss something?

When we set out to find something we loved in every single city neighborhood, we hit an early hurdle: how should we define them? Pittsburghers have long held different definitions of where certain 'hoods end and others begin — as has the city itself, changing official designations more than once.

In the end, we decided to swear by the most recent city maps. That does make for some odd quirks of designation, but we felt it was the only fair standard we could apply.

And while we do love all 90 of our choices, each neighborhood could've provided 90 more — the selections presented here are by no means the best part of their respective neighborhoods, just one of many great components. We're eager to here about your favorite features and landmarks, so let us know: what's your favorite part of your favorite neighborhood?

Hot Reads

From Field to Fork

From Field to Fork

We put together this dynamic guide to help you find and engage with the region’s sustainable producers of meat, honey, alcohol, fruits and vegetables.
Review: Café Zinho

Review: Café Zinho

Seasoned chef and entrepreneur Toni Pais continues to impress folks who dine at his longstanding Mediterranean establishment, Café Zinho.
Sometimes Your Best Friends in Life Aren't on Facebook

Sometimes Your Best Friends in Life Aren't on Facebook

PittGirl wonders if it's still possible to raise kids to be big-hearted people in an age of self-obsession.
City Guide: 200+ Fun Things to Do (No Matter Where You Are)

City Guide: 200+ Fun Things to Do (No Matter Where You Are)

We explore every inch of Allegheny County (and beyond) for a look at the communities where we live, work and play.
6 More Things You Might Not Know About Pittsburgh

6 More Things You Might Not Know About Pittsburgh

PittGirl's at it again — this time with a list of a half-dozen fun facts you'll want to mention at your next cocktail party.
'Which Neighborhood Should I Live In?'

'Which Neighborhood Should I Live In?'

We pick the perfect neighborhood for six breeds of ’Burgher.